By now it should be clear to you that success in network marketing comes with joint efforts. The fastest way to start seeing that residual income, and four-figure months, is to build a strong down-line. But whatever you do, never, ever bother your family and friends to join your team.

If you’ve connected with other network marketers online, no doubt you’ve seen the endless ‘join my team’ posts, promising a rag to riches story and endless bonuses. But actually, this is not an effective way to introduce new people into your business. How often do you see those posts and think ‘yeah, I want in’?
I’m going to bet it’s not quite often.

 

WHY YOU SHOULD NEVER USE “JOIN MY TEAM”

First and foremost, using these words signifies that you are out for yourself. It is going to give prospects the impression that they are working only to help you become successful. You might as well come straight out and say “please sell these products to make me rich”. I’m not saying that this is what you mean with your posts, but it is often how they come across.

The majority of people who join network marketing companies do so to change their life; not that of their sponsor. Make it clear that this is what you’re willing to help them do.

 

YOU FIT TRY!

Turn the tables for a moment. Think about what would make you want to start working with someone.
Any time you are trying to sponsor someone into your downline, whether this be online or in person, you should make the conversation about them. No one is going to want to work at a business that’s all about someone else. (They might as well just stick to the 9-5)

Instead of using the dreaded words ‘join my team’, talk about your prospect: how they can develop their own business and the freedom to work on their own terms. What drew you to network marketing as a career path?
Do not make the prospecting process about you – it should always be about the other person. Show them that this is an opportunity to build a flexible business, on their own terms. And remind them that they are working for themselves but never by themselves.